Two Black Men Trying to Return a TV Were Handcuffed, Sue Walmart Over Racial Incident

Two Black Men Trying to Return a TV Were Handcuffed, Sue Walmart Over Racial Incident

By Kevin L. Clark—Sept. 1, 2021

The ongoing fight against racism across this country gets another swift kick in the pants by two lifelong friends who are taking on a corporate supergiant.

Dennis Stewart, a former police officer, and Terence Richardson, a church pastor, said Walmart store employees discriminated against them because of their race, leading to theft accusations and being placed in handcuffs.

According to a federal lawsuit filed last Thursday by Stewart and Richardson, the men went on a routine trip to the store to exchange a defective 58-inch television one of them purchased earlier that day on Sept. 10, 2020.

The Conroe, Texas, Walmart employees were presented with the $300.94 receipt at the customer service counter, the lawsuit said. After hours spent under examination, four white police officers “approached them from behind and instructed them to put their hands on their head, ordered them not to move, searched their bodies and emptied their pockets, and handcuffed them as criminals in plain view of everyone at the vicinity.”

Eventually, the men were freed from the handcuffs but were accosted by a female employee who screamed at them to “take the TV and get the f–k out of this store, and never come f—–g back,” the filing read. In addition to all of the calamity caused, the men, according to the lawsuit, were required to sign a “Criminal Trespass Warning,” which guarantees that criminal charges remain on file at Walmart if the men try to return to the store.

According to the suit, Stewart and Richardson are asking for a jury trial as well as compensatory and punitive damages.

Read more at Essence.

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