Miami Heat Anthem Singer Takes a Knee

By Latifah Muhammad—Oct 22, 2016

Denasia Lawrence turned her national anthem performance into a social statement that went viral.

As the social worker stepped onto the court ahead of a game between the Mimi Heat and Philadelphia 76ers Friday (Oct. 21), she opened her blazer to reveal a “Black Lives Matter Shirt” T-shirt before taking a knee and belting out the national anthem.

“When I took the opportunity to sing the national anthem at the Heat game, it was bigger than me,” she explained in a Facebook post Saturday (Oct. 22). “Right now, we’re seeing a war on Black & Brown bodies— we’re being unjustly killed and overly criminalized. I took the opportunity to sing AND kneel; to show that we belong in this country AND that we have the right to respectfully protest injustices against us. I took the opportunity to sing AND kneel to show that, I too, am America.”

Lawrence noted that she learned “the value of fighting against injustice,” through her work with youth, families and veterans.

“That all are treated equally no matter their race, gender, sexual orientation, or physical abilities,” she added.

According to the Sun-Sentinel, Lawrence works part-time for the Heat on the team’s “game night operations staff.”

However, Lawrence noted that she wasn’t paid to perform the anthem, and isn’t looking for publicity.

“Black Lives Matter is far larger than a hashtag, it’s a rallying cry,” Lawrence continued. “And until our cry is rightfully heard, protests will still happen and demands will still be made!”

Read more at Vibe.

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